11 Ideal laptops for Openshot in 2023

Do you need a laptop that can handle editing with Openshot? But you don't know what specs to look out for? I gotchu. I've made this guide to help aspiring editors and videographers like you find the best laptops for Openshot without spending more than you have to.

The main goal of this guide is to identify the essential specs that matter and the ones that you don't need to be concerned about.

So, let's cut to the chase – what kind of specs should you look out for? I'll also provide a few specific laptop recommendations for different price brackets. But first things first: I'll provide you with a requirement breakdown for an optimal Openshot laptop.

Processors Explored

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The current laptop processor landscape is dominated by Intel's 12th generation CPUs, Apple's M1 ARM-based SOCs, and AMD's 6th gen Ryzen processors. Intel's and Apple's chips have adopted a hybrid performance/efficiency core design based on big.LITTLE architecture. Ryzen models are best for laptops that need a good battery life.

Since Openshot is a single-threaded application, we can ignore the CPU's core count and focus on its frequency instead. Openshot is not well-optimized for multi-core CPUs, so I'd recommend going for a single-core/thread performance laptop. If you're looking for a MacBook – Apple's processors are known for their excellent single-thread performance, so they're a good option if you're looking for a fast laptop with a long battery life.

I use Cinebench R23 to compare processors because it's one of the best ways to measure single-thread performance; however, it's not the only way – other tests such as PassMark and 3DMark could be used instead. Other considerations include the amount of RAM and storage space – these are essential for any video editor; however, if you're on a budget – don't worry about them too much since they're not as important as the processor and graphics card (if you need one).

To help you decide on the best processor for your needs, here are some recommendations based on the median laptop prices of each tier:

  • Minimum: AMD Ryzen 3 3200U
  • Recommended: i3-10110U
  • High-end: i5-10210U

Graphics Power

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The laptop graphics market is dominated by Nvidia, who recently released their RTX 40 series cards, but unfortunately these aren't yet available for laptops. Instead, the latest laptop graphics chips from Nvidia are in the RTX 30 series, such as the RTX 3070 Ti. Desktop GPUs are now a lot more power-hungry, and so the gap between notebook and desktop graphics cards has widened in the past few years. Nvidia has also discontinued the Max-Q label for its RTX graphics cards, so a laptop manufacturer (OEM) now has to decide the exact wattage for each GPU. That can result in a wide variance in graphics performance even for laptops with the same GPU chipset.

For basic video editing, you can get by with an integrated graphics chip, but if you're looking for better performance and effects, then you'll need a dedicated GPU. If you're only using the stock video effects that come with Premiere Pro and/or After Effects then you don't need a dedicated GPU.

To choose between an AMD and Nvidia GPU, it really depends on your budget and what you're planning to use it for. Generally, Nvidia graphics cards are more power-hungry, but they tend to perform better in many applications, especially when paired with an AMD Ryzen CPU (which has been known to perform well with Nvidia GPUs).

To determine how well a certain GPU will perform, we can use benchmark scores like 3DMark, although these scores are not always indicative of real-world performance.

When it comes to OpenShot video editing, it's best to look for a laptop with a dedicated graphics card (not just an "Advanced" or "Professional" version of the integrated chip). For OpenShot, you'll need at least 4GB of VRAM, which is best provided by the Iris Xe Graphics G7. For better performance, you should look at something like the Quadro T500 or the GeForce MX550.

GPU Recommended Price Range
Iris Xe Graphics G7 Under $1,000
Quadro T500 $1,000 – $2,000
GeForce MX550 Over $2,000

RAM Considerations

Video editing and graphic design are memory intensive tasks that require a lot of RAM to run smoothly. This is especially true when using professional-grade software like Openshot. Unfortunately, not all laptops come with enough RAM to handle demanding tasks. So, when shopping for the right laptop for video editing or graphic design, you need to consider the amount of RAM that it comes with.

Most mid-range laptops come with 16 GB of RAM and high-end – 32 GB or more. If you're looking for an entry-level laptop for your child or a secondary laptop, 16 GB should be sufficient for most tasks. However, if you're looking for a primary laptop that can handle video editing and other demanding tasks, 32 GB would be ideal.

The latest-gen Intel and AMD CPUs support DDR4 and DDR5, though DDR5 is still quite expensive and needs time to mature as a technology. DDR4 is still the most common type of RAM and is widely available at different speeds and capacities. DDR4 also supports ECC (Error-Correcting Code) which helps ensure data integrity, especially when working with high-quality RAW files.

The other factor to consider is the RAM's CL/TIMING CL benchmark which measures how quickly the RAM can access and transfer data. However, these benchmarks can be misleading and don't always reflect the actual performance of the RAM. That's why I don't use them in my laptop reviews.

Here's a handy table of recommended RAM configurations depending on your budget:

Budget Recommended RAM
Entry-Level 8 GB
Mid-Range 16 GB
High-End 32 GB or more

6 Best Laptops for Openshot

ASUS ZenBook 13 UX325EA-EH71

1
Powerful & Portable Laptop with OLED Display & Thunderbolt 4 Ports
Price
$730
i7-1165G7 | Iris Xe Graphics G7 96EUs | 8 GB RAM | 512 GB SSD | 13.3″ OLED; 1920×1080
Pros and cons
Pros
  • Lightweight and portable frame
  • Fast and responsive performance
Cons
  • Poor speakers
  • Weak hinges
Alternatives
$580
Acer Swift 3 SF314-59-75QC
Pros
  • Compact and lightweight design
  • Fast SSD storage
Cons
  • Non-backlit keyboard
  • Poor speakers
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Lenovo IdeaPad Slim 9i

2
A Lightweight and Capable Laptop for Openshot!
Price
$960
i7-1195G7 | Iris Xe Graphics G7 96EUs | 16 GB RAM | 1024 GB SSD | 14″ IPS; 3840×2160
Pros and cons
Pros
  • Slim, lightweight design for portability
  • Strong GPU performance for smooth editing
Cons
  • No integrated SD reader, USB-A, or HDMI
  • Shallow and weak key feedback
Alternatives
$1,130
ASUS ZenBook Pro 15 UM535QE-XH71T
Pros
  • Striking 1080p OLED touchscreen display
  • Exceptionally quiet operation
Cons
  • No DisplayPort-over-USB-C or Power Delivery support
  • RAM not upgradable
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ASUS ROG Zephyrus G14

3
A High-Performance, Compact and Lightweight Laptop for OpenShot
Price
$1320
Ryzen 9 5900HS | RTX 3060 | 40 GB RAM | 2000 GB SSD | 14″; 2560×1440
Pros and cons
Pros
  • Stylish, lightweight and compact case
  • Powerful CPUGPU combination
Cons
  • RAM partially soldered
  • Limited VRAM may not be sufficient for high-end tasks
Alternatives
$1,500
Lenovo Legion 5 Pro
Pros
  • Premium 16:10 IPS display with MUX support
  • Easily serviceable parts
Cons
  • Low-resolution webcam with no IR or privacy shutter
  • Slight uneven backlight bleeding
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Lenovo Legion 5 Pro

4
A Powerful and Upgradable Laptop for Openshot Editing
Price
$1510
i7-12700H | RTX 3050 Ti | 32 GB RAM | 1000 GB SSD | 16″ IPS HDR G-Sync; 2560×1600
Pros and cons
Pros
  • Robust and stylish design
  • Impressive performance for multi-tasking and editing
Cons
  • Bulky form factor and heavy weight
  • Short battery life
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GIGABYTE AORUS 15 XE4

5
A High-Powered Laptop With Thunderbolt 4, PCIe 4.0, and Impressive Battery Life
Price
$1600
i7-12700H | RTX 3070 Ti | 64 GB RAM | 2000 GB SSD | 15.6″ IPS-level; 2560×1440
Pros and cons
Pros
  • Responsive 165Hz Panel for Seamless Video Editing
  • Ample Storage With PCIe 4.0 SSD and Free M.2 Slot
Cons
  • High Power Usage at Idle and Low Loads
  • No Card Reader for External Storage
Alternatives
$1,600
Lenovo Legion 5 Pro
Pros
  • Bright and colorful 16:10 QHD display
  • Serviceable and upgradeable components
Cons
  • Bulky chassis and heavy power brick
  • No biometrics and poor audio quality
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Lenovo ThinkPad P15

6
Powerful, Durable, and Comfortable - The ThinkPad P15 is Ideal for Openshot Editing!
Price
$6050
Xeon W-10855M | Quadro RTX 5000 | 128 GB RAM | 8000 GB SSD | 15.6″ OLED Touch; 3840×2160
Pros and cons
Pros
  • Solid performance from powerful CPU and GPU.
  • Quality construction and comfortable keyboard.
Cons
  • Heavy and bulky.
  • Low brightness of base display.
Alternatives
$6,290
MSI Titan GT77 12UHS-064
Pros
  • Bright 4K Display
  • High System Performance
Cons
  • Bulky and Heavy
  • Very Expensive
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Table of the Best Laptops for Openshot

LaptopPrice (approx)
ASUS ZenBook 13 UX325EA-EH71$730
Lenovo IdeaPad Slim 9i$960
ASUS ROG Zephyrus G14$1320
Lenovo Legion 5 Pro$1510
GIGABYTE AORUS 15 XE4$1600
Lenovo ThinkPad P15$6050

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